Calendar

Feb
18
Mon
2013
Systems Institute & Institute for Computational Medicine Special Seminar @ JHU Homewood, Mason Hall Auditorium
Feb 18 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

John Doyle (Caltech): Universal Laws and Architectures: brains, bugs, nets, dance, art, music, literature, fashion, and zombies

Complex networks arise in a wide range of applications from neuroscience and cell biology to the internet and social networks.  The commonalities in these problems are often either overlooked or oversimplified while domain experts tend to apply different “languages” and mathematical “tools” to them.  This talk will focus on progress towards a more “unified” theory for complex networks. The approaches described are motivated by neuroscience, cell biology, and technology, and involving several elements: hard limits on achievable robust performance ( “laws”), the organizing principles  that succeed or fail in achieving them (architectures and protocols), the resulting high variability data observed in real systems and in case studies (behavior, data), and the processes by which systems evolve (variation, selection, design).  We will leverage a series of case studies from neuroscience, cell biology, human physiology, and technology to illustrate the implications of recent theoretical developments, also drawing on hopefully familiar examples from dance, art, music, literature, fashion, and the recent popular obsession with zombies. More info

Mar
19
Tue
2013
“Complex Systems Science: Solving Complex Problems in a Complex World” Seminar @ Bloomberg School of Public Health Room W2008
Mar 19 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Dr. Yaneer Bar-Yam is the founder and president of the New England Complex Systems Institute. He received his SB and PhD in physics from MIT in 1978 and 1984 respectively. His work explores the origins and impacts of market crashes, ethnic violence, military conflict and pandemics, analyzes social networks, as well as the bases of creativity, panics, evolution and altruism. His work on the causes of the global food crisis was cited as among the top 10 scientific discoveries of 2011 by Wired magazine. Dr. Bar-Yam has advised governments, NGOs, and corporations on using principles and insights from complex systems science to solve seemingly intractable problems. He is the author of two books: his textbook Dynamics of Complex Systems, which he has taught to over 2,000 graduate students, professionals and executives, and Making Things Work, which describes the use of complex systems science for solving problems in healthcare, education, systems engineering, international development, and ethnic conflict.

Nov
18
Tue
2014
“Systems Life Cycle Design Approach to Green Design and Energy Sustainability” seminar by Dr. Harrison Kim @ 234 Ames Hall
Nov 18 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Dr. Harrison Kim is an Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) with appointment at the Beckman Institute and the Computational Science and Engineering. Dr. Kim’s research focuses on a variety of areas of complex systems design and large-scale computation and optimization. Dr. Kim’s current research topics are energy systems engineering; renewable, hybrid energy conversion and distribution; user-centered sustainable product design; product design analytics; multidisciplinary, multilevel optimization; green design. Application areas are automotive, consumer electronics, heavy-duty equipment, national security, commercial/military system of systems, and information technology. Dr. Kim has received numerous recognitions including the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award, Dean’s Award in Excellence in Research (Xerox Award), Best Paper Award in ASME Design for Manufacturing and Life Cycle Conference, and news media coverage in the USA Today and the Chicago Tribune. Harrison Kim earned his Ph.D. degree at the University of Michigan in 2001 in the area of Engineering System Design and Optimization in Mechanical Engineering under the supervision of Prof. Panos Papalambros. He joined the University of Illinois in 2005 after Business-IT consulting experience and postdoctoral training under Prof. Wei Chen at Northwestern University and has been leading the Enterprise Systems Optimization Lab.

 

 

Systems Life Cycle Design Approach to Green Design and Energy Sustainability (abstract)
Emerging interest in the renewable energy sources has garnered new contributions in energy systems engineering. Designing renewable energy generation systems, however, brings additional layer of challenges in that it is impossible to assess and predict exogenous conditions accurately. Hybrid power generation systems (HPGS), with respect to this challenge, can bring a new level of technical and economic performance of power supply by mitigating the effect of uncertainties. Kim’s team recently developed a new suite of systems design methodologies for single HPGS and hybrid energy farms that overcome non-smooth logical disjunction by use of multidisciplinary design optimization with complementarity constraints and various risk and reliability measures. The methods also utilize multi-stage programming model and design analytics capabilities for predicting system behavior in the near future time horizon. In this presentation, the speaker will present the findings from the recent studies sponsored by NSF and industrial partners (Caterpillar and Deere) in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and introduce newly emerging topics in renewable energy systems engineering.
 
Feb
29
Mon
2016
Center for Injury Research and Policy Seminar @ Bloomberg School of Public Health
Feb 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:20 pm

Join the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy for their next Graduate Seminar, featuring Dr. Soames Job of the World Bank. Dr. Job is the Global Lead for Road Safety and he will be discussing the “Safe System Approach for Road Safety” as part of the Engineering Approach to Safety series. This event is being hosted by the Bloomberg School of Public Health and will be held this coming Monday, February 29.

All are welcome to attend!

See the event flyer here.

Center for Systems Science and Engineering