Calendar

Dec
6
Thu
2012
John C. & Susan S.G. Wierman Lecture @ JHU Homewood, Hodson Hall 210
Dec 6 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Richard L. Smith:  Attribution of Extreme Climatic Events

Superstorm Sandy is merely the most recent high-impact weather event to raise concerns about extreme weather events becoming more frequent or more severe. Previous examples include the western European heatwave of 2003, the Russian heatwave and the Pakistan floods of 2010, and the Texas heatwave of 2011. However, it remains an open question to what extent such events may be ““attributed”” to human influences such as increasing greenhouse gases. One way to answer this question is to run climate models under two scenarios, one including all the anthropogenic forcing factors (in particular, greenhouse gases) while the other is run only including the natural forcings (e.g. solar fluctuations) or control runs with no forcings at all. Based on the climate model runs, probabilities of the extreme event of interest may be computed under both scenarios, followed by the risk ratio or the ““fraction of attributable risk””, which has become popular in the climatology community as a measure of the human influence on extreme events. This talk will discuss statistical approaches to these quantities, including the use of extreme value theory as a method of quantifying the risk of extreme events, and Bayesian hierarchical models for combining the results of different climate models. This is joint work with Xuan Li (UNC) and Michael Wehner (Lawrence Berkeley Lab). Event flyer.

Oct
15
Thu
2015
“Hospital Decision-Making During Extreme Weather Events” Seminar @ Gilman Hall 132
Oct 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes, can disrupt how healthcare services are delivered by damaging the infrastructure they depend on. Natural disasters can force hospitals to evacuate. However, evacuation is not without risk. At this seminar, E²SHI Fellow Meghan McGinty will discuss how decisions to either evacuate hospitals or shelter-in-place (continue serving patients on site) were made during Hurricane Sandy in 2012 – and what we can learn from this experience to better prepare for future extreme weather events.

Event Flier

 

Presenter: Meghan McGinty is a PhD candidate in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on public health emergency preparedness and response, disaster resilience, and climate change. She is a 2013-14 E2SHI Fellowship recipient. Learn more about Meghan’s research

Feb
4
Thu
2016
Seminar: Labor Cost Accounting for Small Differences in Operating Room Time @ Hackerman Hall B-17
Feb 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Labor Cost Accounting for Small Differences in Operating Room Time Such as From Lean Methods

Over 25 years, Prof. Dexter & colleagues have studied the health system of anesthesia and
surgical delivery, from the lowest level of using sensor information for making changes
minute to minute through the upper level of health policy. Join his talk to learn
how there can be accurate cost prediction for the impact of structural and operating
room architectural changes that result in small changes in operating room times.
Speaker: Franklin Dexter, MD, PhD
Director, Division of Management Consulting,
Professor, Department of Anesthesia, University of Iowa
Seminar flyer here.

Center for Systems Science and Engineering