Calendar

Apr
10
Wed
2013
Workshop on Systems Methods for Understanding Obesity
Apr 10 @ 12:00 pm – Apr 11 @ 6:00 pm

The Education and Training Core (ETC) of the Johns Hopkins Global Center on Childhood Obesity (JHGCCO) is pleased to announce a training workshop entitled Agent-based and System Dynamics Models: New Tools for UnderstandingObesity. The workshop will begin at noon on Wednesday, April 10, and run until 6 pm on Thursday, April 11, with a dinner and reception on Wednesday night.

The workshop is intended for researchers, program staff, students, trainees, faculty and those with an interest in learning about how agent-based (ABM) and system dynamics (SD) models can be used to gain insights into the causes of, and potential solutions for, the obesity epidemic. The primary faculty for this workshop include Prof. Tak Igusa from the Johns Hopkins Systems Institute and the Whiting School of Engineering, and Prof. Thomas Glass from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. There will also be an invited lecture and discussion by Dr. Amy Auchincloss, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics from Drexel University.

Oct
8
Thu
2015
Modeling Cyclone Risk and Seismic Building Vulnerability in Central America and the Caribbean @ Hackerman Hall B-17
Oct 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Graduate Seminar: Modeling Cyclone Risk and Seismic Building Vulnerability in Central America and the Caribbean

This seminar will introduce two research projects applied to the Country Disaster Risk Profiles initiative of the World Bank: a hurricane hazard model and a probabilistic seismic vulnerability tool (PSVT). The windstorm hazard model is a novel approach which yields characterizations of windstorm activity (rate of occurrence, trajectory and spatial wind field) in the Central American region for use in natural risk assessment. The generative mechanism of storms is formulated as a superposition of stochastic processes whose joint opera;on yields synthetic cyclones activity in the region. The outcomes of the model match observed data acceptably well. A brief reference to the risk estimation procedure will be offered. Vulnerability functions estimate building damage caused by an acting hazard intensity. The PSVT is a software tool for creating vulnerability functions for seismic risk analysis. The approach estimates structural response of user-defined models subjected to ground acceleration signals integrating the equations of motion. Ground signals are realizations of random process models of site–specific ground motion hazard.

 

Speaker: Dr. Gonzalo Pita
Adjunct Assistant Scientist, Department of Civil Engineering, Johns Hopkins University; Sr. Natural Risk and Vulnerability Specialist, The World Bank

Center for Systems Science and Engineering