Calendar

Apr
2
Tue
2013
“Modeling Public Health and Medicine: STScI Engineering & Technology” Colloquium @ John Bahcall Auditorium, Space Telescope Science Institute, Muller Building, San Martin Drive
Apr 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Systems dynamics and agent-based modeling have recently been used to explore complex systems in a wide range of disciplines. This talk will begin with a quick tutorial outlining the basic principles of these computational tools. Several simulations will be shown to demonstrate the visual aspects of the methods. A few current research applications in public health and medicine at Johns Hopkins will also be described. The talk will conclude with a brief, apolitical analysis of sequestration.

Tak Igusa is the founding Director for Education and Research of the Johns Hopkins Systems Institute. He received an A.B. in Applied Mathematics at Harvard and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at Berkeley and was on the faculty at Northwestern University before returning to Baltimore in 1999 as a professor at Johns Hopkins. His research interests are in the application of mathematical modeling to understanding systems in public health, civil infrastructure, and medicine. His interests also include structural dynamics, acoustics, and applications of statistics and probability theory to problems in civil and mechanical engineering, and more recently in atmospheric science.

Tea & Cookies will be served at 2:45 pm

Oct
8
Thu
2015
Modeling Cyclone Risk and Seismic Building Vulnerability in Central America and the Caribbean @ Hackerman Hall B-17
Oct 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Graduate Seminar: Modeling Cyclone Risk and Seismic Building Vulnerability in Central America and the Caribbean

This seminar will introduce two research projects applied to the Country Disaster Risk Profiles initiative of the World Bank: a hurricane hazard model and a probabilistic seismic vulnerability tool (PSVT). The windstorm hazard model is a novel approach which yields characterizations of windstorm activity (rate of occurrence, trajectory and spatial wind field) in the Central American region for use in natural risk assessment. The generative mechanism of storms is formulated as a superposition of stochastic processes whose joint opera;on yields synthetic cyclones activity in the region. The outcomes of the model match observed data acceptably well. A brief reference to the risk estimation procedure will be offered. Vulnerability functions estimate building damage caused by an acting hazard intensity. The PSVT is a software tool for creating vulnerability functions for seismic risk analysis. The approach estimates structural response of user-defined models subjected to ground acceleration signals integrating the equations of motion. Ground signals are realizations of random process models of site–specific ground motion hazard.

 

Speaker: Dr. Gonzalo Pita
Adjunct Assistant Scientist, Department of Civil Engineering, Johns Hopkins University; Sr. Natural Risk and Vulnerability Specialist, The World Bank

Feb
29
Mon
2016
Center for Injury Research and Policy Seminar @ Bloomberg School of Public Health
Feb 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:20 pm

Join the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy for their next Graduate Seminar, featuring Dr. Soames Job of the World Bank. Dr. Job is the Global Lead for Road Safety and he will be discussing the “Safe System Approach for Road Safety” as part of the Engineering Approach to Safety series. This event is being hosted by the Bloomberg School of Public Health and will be held this coming Monday, February 29.

All are welcome to attend!

See the event flyer here.

Center for Systems Science and Engineering