Calendar

Feb
18
Mon
2013
Systems Institute & Institute for Computational Medicine Special Seminar @ JHU Homewood, Mason Hall Auditorium
Feb 18 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

John Doyle (Caltech): Universal Laws and Architectures: brains, bugs, nets, dance, art, music, literature, fashion, and zombies

Complex networks arise in a wide range of applications from neuroscience and cell biology to the internet and social networks.  The commonalities in these problems are often either overlooked or oversimplified while domain experts tend to apply different “languages” and mathematical “tools” to them.  This talk will focus on progress towards a more “unified” theory for complex networks. The approaches described are motivated by neuroscience, cell biology, and technology, and involving several elements: hard limits on achievable robust performance ( “laws”), the organizing principles  that succeed or fail in achieving them (architectures and protocols), the resulting high variability data observed in real systems and in case studies (behavior, data), and the processes by which systems evolve (variation, selection, design).  We will leverage a series of case studies from neuroscience, cell biology, human physiology, and technology to illustrate the implications of recent theoretical developments, also drawing on hopefully familiar examples from dance, art, music, literature, fashion, and the recent popular obsession with zombies. More info

Mar
19
Tue
2013
“Complex Systems Science: Solving Complex Problems in a Complex World” Seminar @ Bloomberg School of Public Health Room W2008
Mar 19 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Dr. Yaneer Bar-Yam is the founder and president of the New England Complex Systems Institute. He received his SB and PhD in physics from MIT in 1978 and 1984 respectively. His work explores the origins and impacts of market crashes, ethnic violence, military conflict and pandemics, analyzes social networks, as well as the bases of creativity, panics, evolution and altruism. His work on the causes of the global food crisis was cited as among the top 10 scientific discoveries of 2011 by Wired magazine. Dr. Bar-Yam has advised governments, NGOs, and corporations on using principles and insights from complex systems science to solve seemingly intractable problems. He is the author of two books: his textbook Dynamics of Complex Systems, which he has taught to over 2,000 graduate students, professionals and executives, and Making Things Work, which describes the use of complex systems science for solving problems in healthcare, education, systems engineering, international development, and ethnic conflict.

Sep
8
Tue
2015
Seminar: Infrastructure, Policy and Red Tape @ Hodson Hall 203
Sep 8 @ 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm

Today, Tuesday 9/8, Caitlin Doolin of the Baltimore City Department of Transportation is opening up the discussion of the city’s role in the partnership between drivers and bicyclists.

From the Car to the Bike: Infrastructure, Policy and Red Tape

 

Livable streets that prioritize walking, biking and transit are proven to improve quality of life, improve economic value of neighborhoods, address equity issues and improve health and safety of our cities. It can seem like while the rest of the world is taking off with protected bike lanes and premium transit investments, Baltimore is struggling to catch up, but the reality is this paradigm shift from the car is difficult everywhere. Believe it or not it was even difficult in Copenhagen 40 years ago! Come learn and engage in a discussion about how infrastructure, policy and politics are shaping how our urban streets serve bicyclists.

Oct
15
Thu
2015
“Hospital Decision-Making During Extreme Weather Events” Seminar @ Gilman Hall 132
Oct 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes, can disrupt how healthcare services are delivered by damaging the infrastructure they depend on. Natural disasters can force hospitals to evacuate. However, evacuation is not without risk. At this seminar, E²SHI Fellow Meghan McGinty will discuss how decisions to either evacuate hospitals or shelter-in-place (continue serving patients on site) were made during Hurricane Sandy in 2012 – and what we can learn from this experience to better prepare for future extreme weather events.

Event Flier

 

Presenter: Meghan McGinty is a PhD candidate in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on public health emergency preparedness and response, disaster resilience, and climate change. She is a 2013-14 E2SHI Fellowship recipient. Learn more about Meghan’s research

Oct
29
Thu
2015
Seminar: Tsunami and Geodisasters @ Hackerman Hall B-17
Oct 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Tsunami & Geodisasters: A Decade of Lifeline Engineering

The rise of mega-disasters this century prompted development of engineering solutions for community and infrastructure resilience. ASCE 7-16 will include a new Chapter 6 Tsunami Loads and Effects, drawn from context of the 2011 Japan Tohoku Tsunami and resulting Fukushima Plant disaster. Chapter 6 is a bottom up state of the art design methodology focused on loss drivers, contrasting with other hazard provisions revised ad-hoc over several decades. The tsunami hazards awakening from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, claiming nearly 300,000 fatalities, brought attention to need for broad disaster preparedness of vulnerable populations. In the Post 9-11 Security environment, it pushed efforts to develop methods for all-hazards community and infrastructure resilience using multi-faceted research, performance based engineering and improved standards and building codes. Tsunami and other understudied hazards are advancing now with relatively low cost digitized maps, lidar and geospatial tools used for rapid exposure screening, loss modeling and engagement by the insurance and business supply chain industry. The experience from tsunami, and its seismic and flood components is a useful context for understanding disaster resilience using a lifeline infrastructure engineering framework, to help communities identify and prioritize diverse needs. Recent initiatives include the UN Disaster Resilience Scorecard developed by IBM and AECOM in 2014, and the ASCE Infrastructure Resilience Division launched earlier this year. Both support the 2015 UN Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development ratified one month ago in New York for guiding actions over the next 15 years.

Speaker: Mathew Francis, Infrastructure Resilience Manager, AECOM Technology Corporation

Feb
29
Mon
2016
Center for Injury Research and Policy Seminar @ Bloomberg School of Public Health
Feb 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:20 pm

Join the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy for their next Graduate Seminar, featuring Dr. Soames Job of the World Bank. Dr. Job is the Global Lead for Road Safety and he will be discussing the “Safe System Approach for Road Safety” as part of the Engineering Approach to Safety series. This event is being hosted by the Bloomberg School of Public Health and will be held this coming Monday, February 29.

All are welcome to attend!

See the event flyer here.

Center for Systems Science and Engineering