Calendar

Mar
19
Tue
2013
“Complex Systems Science: Solving Complex Problems in a Complex World” Seminar @ Bloomberg School of Public Health Room W2008
Mar 19 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Dr. Yaneer Bar-Yam is the founder and president of the New England Complex Systems Institute. He received his SB and PhD in physics from MIT in 1978 and 1984 respectively. His work explores the origins and impacts of market crashes, ethnic violence, military conflict and pandemics, analyzes social networks, as well as the bases of creativity, panics, evolution and altruism. His work on the causes of the global food crisis was cited as among the top 10 scientific discoveries of 2011 by Wired magazine. Dr. Bar-Yam has advised governments, NGOs, and corporations on using principles and insights from complex systems science to solve seemingly intractable problems. He is the author of two books: his textbook Dynamics of Complex Systems, which he has taught to over 2,000 graduate students, professionals and executives, and Making Things Work, which describes the use of complex systems science for solving problems in healthcare, education, systems engineering, international development, and ethnic conflict.

May
27
Wed
2015
Seminar: Smart Technology-Enabled Building Energy and Peak Load Reduction and Their Effects on Occupants and the Indoor Environment @ Malone Hall room 107
May 27 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Cetin

Kristen Cetin is a PhD candidate at the University of Texas at Austin, in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, in the Building Energy and Environment Group. She is also a licensed professional engineer and a LEED professional. Her research focuses on the use smart grid-connected technologies to reduce building energy use and peak loads, and assessing their effects on building occupants and the indoor environment.

 

 

SMART TECHNOLOGY-ENABLED BUILDING ENERGY AND PEAK LOAD REDUCTION AND THEIR EFFECTS ON OCCUPANTS AND THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

Building operations consume approximately 72% of electricity in the United States, and are responsible for over 70% of the peak demand on the electric grid, particularly in warm climates. The increasing deployment of technologies such as smart meters, home energy management systems (HEMS), and smart home-connected sensors and devices and their associated data provide an opportunity for data-driven operation and evaluation of the performance of buildings and their systems. This is particularly important as we face challenges in energy price fluctuations, distributed and renewable energy grid integration, and climate variability. More

 

Center for Systems Science and Engineering