Academics

Developments of modern technologies and advances in science and engineering have made multi-disciplinary research possible, and also necessary for facing the challenges of today and tomorrow. The Center for Systems Science and Engineering is the perfect place for doing such multidisciplinary research. Whether it is solving large-scale energy problems, measuring impact or earthquakes, or figuring out algorithms that will take patients out of hospitals quicker, our systems students use a wide variety of tools and apply them to the diverse needs of society.

Students can pursue a degree in systems through the following departments:

Sample graduate programs are provided below. Both undergraduates and masters students are encouraged to apply to the PhD program.

Any student interested in a PhD with a focus on systems should contact Dr. Sauleh Siddiqui.

 

Masters Programs
  • The M.S.E. in Civil Engineering can be tailored to accommodate a focus on systems across a broad range of research areas. Students graduating with a systems-focused M.S.E. would have completed eight courses and independent research leading to a master’s thesis, or ten courses only (course-only option). The courses can be selected from the list below of systems-related courses taught in the Departments of Civil Engineering, Geography and Environmental Engineering and Applied Math and Statistics.

    Master degree students work with their thesis advisor to select the range of courses that are suitable for the area of systems research they are interested in.

    More information about the master’s program in Civil Engineering can be found here.

    A full catalog of courses offered in Civil Engineering this semester can be found here.

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    Systems courses: 

    560.447 Systems Science for a Dynamic World
    560.498 Survey of Systems Engineering Tools
    560.640 Advanced Systems Engineering: Concept, Design, Development, and Integration
    560.764 Infrastructure Asset Management
    560.766 Multi-Hazard Risk Mitigation
    570.305 Environmental Engineering Systems Design
    570.495 Optimization Foundations for Environmental Engineering and Design
    570.497 Risk and Decision Analysis
    570.605 Interdisciplinary Research Practice in Sustainability and Health
    550.463 Network Models in Operations Research
    550.661 Foundations in Optimization
    550.662 Optimization Algorithms
    550.666 Combinatorial Optimization
    570.676 Stochastic Programming

     

  • Students who are interested in a systems approach to the environment can pursue an M.S.E. in Environmental Management and Economics in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering.

    This program focuses on using models of physical and economic systems to analyze and improve the design of public policies and environmental control systems.

    Students are required to complete ten courses from the lists on the right, or eight courses and an independent research project, submitted as a formal essay.

    More information about this program can be found here.

    A full catalog of courses offered in DoGEE this semester can be found here (filter by department).

    Required Courses:

    570.493 Economic Foundations for Public Decision Making
    570.495 Optimization Foundations for Environmental Engineering and Design
    570.497 Risk and Decision Analysis

    Recommended electives:

    At least one course in physical, chemical or biological processes
    570.605 Interdisciplinary Research Practice in Sustainability and Health
    570.607 Energy Planning and Policy Modeling DoGEE
    570.608 Data Analytics for Engineering, Policy, and Management
    570.618 Multiobjective Programming and Planning
    570.676 Stochastic Programming
    570.873 Public Systems & Economics Seminar

  • The Applied Math and Statistics Department offers an M.S.E. There are currently no required courses but the list on the right includes those that are appropriate for this area of study. Students can work with their advisors to select courses that are appropriate for their interests. Up to three courses taught outside of the department can be included with the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee and the student’s advisor.

    More information about graduate programs in AMS can be found here.

    A full catalog of courses offered in AMS this semester can be found here (filter by department).

    Operations Research Courses:

    550.433 Monte Carlo Methods
    550.453 Mathematical Game Theory
    550.461 Optimization in Finance
    550.463 Network Models in Operations Research
    550.661 Foundations in Optimization
    550.662 Optimization Algorithms
    550.666 Combinatorial Optimization
    550.723 Markov Chains

Doctoral Programs

The emphasis in the Ph.D. systems-focused degree is upon a sound foundation in the fundamentals in a given area with considerable flexibility in course selection determined by the interests and background of each graduate student.  The Department of Civil Engineering offers opportunities for a broad application of systems thinking and modeling in many areas like Energy, Public Health, Disaster Planning, Medicine, and Infrastructure. Systems is an inherently cross-disciplinary subject and students are encouraged to take courses from outside their home department. These courses are supplemented by systems seminars, listed on the Systems Institute website. Students with a primary interest in Operations Research, and those who wish to apply systems thinking and modeling to improve the design of public policies and environmental control systems can also enroll in the programs offered by Applied Math & Statistics and the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering (DoGEE). There is considerable overlap and collaboration between these departments. To find out more about the research interests of individual faculty, please see the Systems Faculty page or contact Dr. Sauleh Siddiqui.

Our doctoral students take the equivalent of about two full academic years of formal course work. Roughly half of this is done in the principal subject area and the rest is chosen from allied fields. Although systems is a subject that crosses traditional departmental boundaries, doctoral students still take the Departmental Qualifying Exam (DQE) for their home department, and are also encouraged to take the appropriate core departmental classes to successfully pass the exam.

Please go to our Faculty page for information on faculty members whose research is in systems

Center for Systems Science and Engineering